Fablab Lima

Av. República de Panamá 3418 San Isidro 15047

Fab Lab

Space size 30 m²

Opened in January 2011

Structure type Private company

Explored in September 2018


We are a genuinely open institution. We have the strong conviction that the human mind is the most powerful tool of transformation in the Universe. That is why we want to develop the talent that each person has to take him to a next level. We are a private, non-partisan, non-profit research center. Our mission is to advance the state of the art of Digital Fabrication and to generate new interrelationships between Art, Science and Technology through applied research and creative inquiry. One of our programs jointly with Fab Lab Network, is the diffusion, promotion and technical assistance for the deployment of Digital Fabrication Laboratories (Fab Lab) as a medium to increase technological infrastructure and to transfer capabilities for Science and Technology-based Innovation.

Social networks

Main interests

Technology - machines & tools Community Entrepreneurship Industry & innovation Education Science & biology Food Mobility & transports

This workshop is great for:

Entrepreneurs Schools & universities Small & medium businesses Large companies Public organisations

The closest workshops nearby are:

Get onboard the Floating Fablab project !

The concept : a fablab on a fully sustainable boat that will drift up and down a portion of the Amazon River, delivering education and access to technology to the many underserved communities that live there.

This project needs you to become a reality!

Our workshop

Learn more about our space, members, machines & services!

The Fablab Lima’s story is intrinsically linked to the story of the FabLab movement in South America as it was the first FabLab to settle there and has influenced the creation of many others.

Despite the fact FabLab movement was born in the America continent, the idea of the creation of this lab emerged on the other side of the Atlantic.

Indeed, the buzz generated by the success of the FabLab of Barcelona founded by Thomas Diez in the 2000’s motivated the cooperation agency of Spain to create one in Latin America. But where to start was the question asked to branches’ directors of this institution spread in Latin American countries. Due to its relative political stability, Peru appeared as a serious candidate.

Thus, it brought Thomas Diez to travel to the Inca land in 2008 to find the nuggets who could put the first stone of the FabLab empire. To do so, he organized meetings to gather 200 motivated people and finally selected two who have had the chance to be the generation 1 of the Fab Academy at the Iaac and taught by Neil Gershenfield to give them the key to fund a FabLab in Latin America in return.

The elected talents were Victor Freudt and Benito Juarez. The former was initially contacted by Thomas Diez thanks to its urban lab project which purpose was the analysis of neighbor development patterns.

In 2010, they came back to found the FabLab Lima in the UNI university but also they organized the seventh international FabLab congress « FAB7 » in 2011, the first held in Latin America.

The Fablab Lima moved in three other places, the cultural center of Spain, the Metropolitano museum of Lima and then Ingenio Learning space waiting the end of the restoration of the cultural center of Spain where it should finally settle. This lab having several 3D printers and a laser cutting machine is open to everyone and Volunteers to work on the various projects are welcomed!

Since the beginning, it helped the creation of many labs, founded the FabLaT network and the FabLab kids concept and helped many entrepreneurs to give birth to their project like Digitoys, iFurniture, H2OSTEAM program.

In Latin America, it is still an important node of the FabLab network and a referent for the FabFoundation.

To introduce you to the Fablab Lima team, we cannot list you the members and their activities. The reason is simple but very interesting: since 2013, they developed a unique model to attract talents and to ensure the involvement of their members.

Members of Fablab Lima, excepted Benito Juarez, the funder, and his associates, are freelances and volunteers. The notion of employees doesn’t exist. The freelances are paid depending on their investment in a project. The volunteers are not paid: they receive training in exchange for the participation in a project linked to their training and interests. Most of the paid members started as volunteers to develop new skills and experience. A weekly meeting is held each Friday where each member shares his weekly activities, news, business opportunities and where tasks are spread among the members depending on their skills and availabilities. The team has even developed a platform, called Fabgame, to assess the impact of each project or action made by the team. Frequently, calls for volunteers are organized to recruit new citizens, willing to be involved in impactful and innovative projects, to develop trendy skills and to meet passionate people.

This model requires transparency and good communication among the team but it enables each member to be involved in other professional activities. For instance, Michael Hurtado, one of the associate, is also a teacher in a prestigious university and manages 3 companies he created. Being part of Fablab Lima is for him a way of investigating new lines of research and meeting passionate people to work with. Henry Sanchez developed his company Digitoys in the Fablab such as Vaneza Caycho Ñuflo who created her company iFurniture. Both received international prizes for their company and work with the Fablab Lima as partners. If this model offers a great flexibility to his members while ensuring their involvement and professionalism in the projects, the biggest challenge is now to retain as freelances a higher percentage of volunteers over time. And for that, the team isn’t short of ideas: new lines of project or Fabcoins (bitcoin for maker) are already in the pipes.

Since its creation, in 2010, the Fablab Lima is a key actor of the maker movement in Central and Latin America. In association with the Fab Foundation, it helped the creation of dozen of Fablabs in the continent and trained dozen of makers. If the 5 first years, his role was to communicate about the power of digital fabrication by organizing and attending events and by offering to anyone tools and workshops in an open space.

Nowadays, due to the high demand of companies, universities and public institutions, it concentrates its effort on designing impactful programs while training volunteers who support it. To support the users’ shift from product to project and then to program, 2 methodologies have been created. The first one is the “Symbiocreation”: the team organizes collaborative challenge which results in a common proposition or project which is the sum of everyone ideas or projects, even of remote participants. The second tool developed is the “Industry Maturity Index”(IMI) which assesses the level of production (out of 4) of an industry to identify the best way of introducing digital fabrication and to produce efficient results (level 0 being the individual sell of raw material and level 4 the massive sell of personalized products). Users of this tool are either big companies such as BID (Banco Interamericano De Desarrollo) or local entrepreneurs such as Víctor Camones who produced low-cost shoes and clothes with natural materials and colors. This later, who had an IMI of 2.07, was helped by Fablab Lima to jump to 4.0 by producing designed and personalized clothes with a perfect mix between digital fabrication and his expertise in natural color and material.

In addition to the spread of the digital fabrication through services for clients, the Fablab is deeply involved in lot of social actions such as kids workshops, event organization such as Tedx Lima, the projects of the Fablab red in Latin America (FabLat) or high scale projects such as the construction of an Amazon floating fablab. The idea is to develop a floating platform that could adapt itself to the variation of the river. It will be used for research into bioremediation and to foster social inclusion by bringing education and technology to neglected and remote communities.

To launch the lab, the cooperation agency of Spain financed both the FabAcademy program of Victor Freudt and Benito Juarez at the Iaac in Barcelona and the machines of the FabLab Lima.

The UNI university initially offered them a space but two years later decided to manage the lab with its own resources. As a consequence, the FabLab Lima moved to the cultural center of Spain and then to the Metropolitano Museum for free. And today (2018), waiting for the restoration of the cultural center of Spain, it is located in the Ingenio Learning space for a fee corresponding to a percentage of the workshops given in the lab.

The lab generates revenues thanks to its consulting mission, for instance, to create new makerspaces and its workshops like Digitoys workshops and Bio STEAM workshops. The revenues are then redistributed to the author of the workshops or project and the makers who contributed to its organization.

To have a bigger impact, the lab is also helped by volunteers.

The Fablab Lima’s story is intrinsically linked to the story of the FabLab movement in South America as it was the first FabLab to settle there and has influenced the creation of many others.

Despite the fact FabLab movement was born in the America continent, the idea of the creation of this lab emerged on the other side of the Atlantic.

Indeed, the buzz generated by the success of the FabLab of Barcelona founded by Thomas Diez in the 2000’s motivated the cooperation agency of Spain to create one in Latin America. But where to start was the question asked to branches’ directors of this institution spread in Latin American countries. Due to its relative political stability, Peru appeared as a serious candidate.

Thus, it brought Thomas Diez to travel to the Inca land in 2008 to find the nuggets who could put the first stone of the FabLab empire. To do so, he organized meetings to gather 200 motivated people and finally selected two who have had the chance to be the generation 1 of the Fab Academy at the Iaac and taught by Neil Gershenfield to give them the key to fund a FabLab in Latin America in return.

The elected talents were Victor Freudt and Benito Juarez. The former was initially contacted by Thomas Diez thanks to its urban lab project which purpose was the analysis of neighbor development patterns.

In 2010, they came back to found the FabLab Lima in the UNI university but also they organized the seventh international FabLab congress « FAB7 » in 2011, the first held in Latin America.

The Fablab Lima moved in three other places, the cultural center of Spain, the Metropolitano museum of Lima and then Ingenio Learning space waiting the end of the restoration of the cultural center of Spain where it should finally settle. This lab having several 3D printers and a laser cutting machine is open to everyone and Volunteers to work on the various projects are welcomed!

Since the beginning, it helped the creation of many labs, founded the FabLaT network and the FabLab kids concept and helped many entrepreneurs to give birth to their project like Digitoys, iFurniture, H2OSTEAM program.

In Latin America, it is still an important node of the FabLab network and a referent for the FabFoundation.

To introduce you to the Fablab Lima team, we cannot list you the members and their activities. The reason is simple but very interesting: since 2013, they developed a unique model to attract talents and to ensure the involvement of their members.

Members of Fablab Lima, excepted Benito Juarez, the funder, and his associates, are freelances and volunteers. The notion of employees doesn’t exist. The freelances are paid depending on their investment in a project. The volunteers are not paid: they receive training in exchange for the participation in a project linked to their training and interests. Most of the paid members started as volunteers to develop new skills and experience. A weekly meeting is held each Friday where each member shares his weekly activities, news, business opportunities and where tasks are spread among the members depending on their skills and availabilities. The team has even developed a platform, called Fabgame, to assess the impact of each project or action made by the team. Frequently, calls for volunteers are organized to recruit new citizens, willing to be involved in impactful and innovative projects, to develop trendy skills and to meet passionate people.

This model requires transparency and good communication among the team but it enables each member to be involved in other professional activities. For instance, Michael Hurtado, one of the associate, is also a teacher in a prestigious university and manages 3 companies he created. Being part of Fablab Lima is for him a way of investigating new lines of research and meeting passionate people to work with. Henry Sanchez developed his company Digitoys in the Fablab such as Vaneza Caycho Ñuflo who created her company iFurniture. Both received international prizes for their company and work with the Fablab Lima as partners. If this model offers a great flexibility to his members while ensuring their involvement and professionalism in the projects, the biggest challenge is now to retain as freelances a higher percentage of volunteers over time. And for that, the team isn’t short of ideas: new lines of project or Fabcoins (bitcoin for maker) are already in the pipes.

Since its creation, in 2010, the Fablab Lima is a key actor of the maker movement in Central and Latin America. In association with the Fab Foundation, it helped the creation of dozen of Fablabs in the continent and trained dozen of makers. If the 5 first years, his role was to communicate about the power of digital fabrication by organizing and attending events and by offering to anyone tools and workshops in an open space.

Nowadays, due to the high demand of companies, universities and public institutions, it concentrates its effort on designing impactful programs while training volunteers who support it. To support the users’ shift from product to project and then to program, 2 methodologies have been created. The first one is the “Symbiocreation”: the team organizes collaborative challenge which results in a common proposition or project which is the sum of everyone ideas or projects, even of remote participants. The second tool developed is the “Industry Maturity Index”(IMI) which assesses the level of production (out of 4) of an industry to identify the best way of introducing digital fabrication and to produce efficient results (level 0 being the individual sell of raw material and level 4 the massive sell of personalized products). Users of this tool are either big companies such as BID (Banco Interamericano De Desarrollo) or local entrepreneurs such as Víctor Camones who produced low-cost shoes and clothes with natural materials and colors. This later, who had an IMI of 2.07, was helped by Fablab Lima to jump to 4.0 by producing designed and personalized clothes with a perfect mix between digital fabrication and his expertise in natural color and material.

In addition to the spread of the digital fabrication through services for clients, the Fablab is deeply involved in lot of social actions such as kids workshops, event organization such as Tedx Lima, the projects of the Fablab red in Latin America (FabLat) or high scale projects such as the construction of an Amazon floating fablab. The idea is to develop a floating platform that could adapt itself to the variation of the river. It will be used for research into bioremediation and to foster social inclusion by bringing education and technology to neglected and remote communities.

To launch the lab, the cooperation agency of Spain financed both the FabAcademy program of Victor Freudt and Benito Juarez at the Iaac in Barcelona and the machines of the FabLab Lima.

The UNI university initially offered them a space but two years later decided to manage the lab with its own resources. As a consequence, the FabLab Lima moved to the cultural center of Spain and then to the Metropolitano Museum for free. And today (2018), waiting for the restoration of the cultural center of Spain, it is located in the Ingenio Learning space for a fee corresponding to a percentage of the workshops given in the lab.

The lab generates revenues thanks to its consulting mission, for instance, to create new makerspaces and its workshops like Digitoys workshops and Bio STEAM workshops. The revenues are then redistributed to the author of the workshops or project and the makers who contributed to its organization.

To have a bigger impact, the lab is also helped by volunteers.

Technologies & processes available

3D printing Laser cutting Electronics Computing & softwares

Services offered

Creativity sessions Coaching & project mentoring Classes & workshops Pop-up workshops Startups & projects incubation / mentoring Talks & conferences Education missions Building together a team of makers

Our best practices

The inspiring things we do here to run our collaborative space

New model of volunteers

categories
Community Business model The workshop team

What is it?

In this model, the Fablab offers to volunteers a free training in exchange for their participation in projects.

In concrete terms?

Frequently the Fablab Lima organizes a call for volunteers to gather people willing to develop new skills, to be part of impactful projects or to be part of a community of talented and passionate people. In 2 hours, they organized activities for people to get to know each other, to collaborated and to discover the makerspace activities and spirit. Each one can select an area of interest represented by a team member who plays the role of coordinator. This role consists of being the contact point with the volunteers, to assess their skills and knowledge, to design and perform adapted training and to coordinate their participation in projects related to their training, depending on their skills.

Why it’s interesting?

It makes the training more accessible to anyone regardless of their financial state and it offers the possibility for volunteers to put into practice what they learn through projects. For the lab, it selects only motivated people to increase the community and the return on investment is achieved through their participation in projects. However, the limit of this model is the sustainability: volunteers don’t stay in long-term which requires the team to constantly recruit and train new volunteers to ensure a continuity in the projects. Nevertheless, the team of Fablab Lima is testing new ways of retaining people such as the use of FabCoin, an international and digital money for makers.

Contact : beno@fablablima.org

Our makers projects

Get inspired by the DIY projects of our team & members

H2STEAM Program

It’s an educational program designed for kids from 5 to 12 years old to teach them key knowledge and competencies in biology to improve their conditions of living and make them actor of their environment resilience.

With the help of 3 coordinators and 6 tutors, we are training teachers so that they can perform 4 workshops for kids. During 2 sessions of 3 hours, we learn them basic knowledge about digital fabrication. Then, we organized 4 sessions of 3 hours. Each session is a specific workshop. We train them during 3 hours in a week and the next week we assist them when they replicate the workshop with their students.

The current program is designed to sensitize kids about mosquito dangers. It’s made of 4 workshops :

  1. in the first one, kids design and print in 3D the different forms of a mosquito to be able to recognize them
  2. in the second one, they rub their hands in a plaque to see later the proliferation of bacterium
  3. in the third one, they build a bacterium and a virus to simulate with light the contagion
  4. in the last one, they simulate the bacterium hacking to illustrate how science, by modifying genes, can prevent mosquito to spread diseases

Digitoys

Digitoys is a STEAM educative project for Children developed by Henry Sanchez and Gaston, his 4 years old nephew. The purpose is to teach children building their own physical toys thanks to 3D modeling and 3D printing process. These capabilities are not inherent but PLAY and LEARN are. It makes the workshops very lively and children-friendly and in the end, knowledge is more easily assimilated.


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