Kyoto Makers Garage (by Makers Boot Camp)

Don't buy things, make them!

73-1 Sujakuhōzōchō Shimogyō-ku Kyōto-shi Kyōto-fu 600-8846

Makerspace

Superficie 100 m²

Ouvert en Septembre 2017

Type de structure Private company

Exploré en Octobre 2017


Kyoto Makers Garage is a space for everyone who wants to step into the maker’s world, and a community of makers and thinkers in Kyoto!

Thématiques principales

Communauté Entrepreneuriat Design Education Electronique Technologie - machines & outils Art & culture

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In the region of Kyoto and Osaka, over a hundred SMEs specialized in healthcare, IoT or industry 4.0 and big companies such as Nintendo compose the Monozukuri ecosystem (Monozukuri = manufacturing).

Despite this bustling industrial environment, as Japan is a high risk-adverse country, entrepreneurs and start-ups struggle to get funding and to succeed their design for manufacturing (DFM).

That’s how Makino, Kenshin and Masatoshi decided to create in 2015 “Makers Boot Camp” (MBC). First hardware accelerator, then Corporate Venture Capital (CVC); MBC grows foreign and Japanese IoT based start-ups and accompany them to face the “Valley of Death”: the Design For Manufacturing.

Besides supporting startups, Makers Boot Camp decided to create its own makerspace: Kyoto Makers Garage (KMG) in September 2017 to give the entrepreneur mindset to the students of their region. In Japan, once you’ve finished your studies, it’s almost too late to become an entrepreneur as you’ve most likely started your career path in a big company. That’s here that Kyoto Makers Garage intervenes: their objective is to coach junior high school and university students who want to become an entrepreneur, a maker.

Both a makerspace and a co-working space, KMG wants people to be focused on IoT products and product design.

The key user figures are the following:

  • 25 hardware start-ups are followed by Makers Boot Camp,
  • 300 to 400 people entered Kyoto Makers Garage so far,
  • 20 regular members attended classes in the makerspace

If we focus on the makerspace’s users,

  • 50% of them are students as it’s free for them to use the space
  • The rest of it are makers (male professionals) and entrepreneurs.
  • Kyoto Makers Garage targets at the end of the year 60 to 70 monthly members.

Most those makers enter the lab to get connections, access qualitative machines and have an office. Diversity if key here. Thereby, a user is currently working on a keyboard and another one develops a work-of-art for an exhibition in Kyoto.

As students use the space for free, some of them volunteer freely to help KMG team build the space: machine repair, creation of user manuals to use the machines, etc.

According to the makerspace team, Japan, and especially Kyoto, is still at the beginning of its “maker journey”. Even though the government tries to foster the start-up movement and partly funded Kyoto Makers Garage, “there’s not enough makerspaces”: machines are barely affordable and accessible. Moreover, the Japanese society is still very structured and strict: once graduated, you’re doomed to be a full-time employee in a large company. Being an entrepreneur, in other words “free-timer”, is full of obstacles to get a loan or even a credit card.

Part of Makers Boot Camp organization, Kyoto Makers Garage was financially supported by Kyoto City at 80% for 3 years and the CVC itself.

The main revenues of the makerspace come from:

  • Events
  • Membership: 45$ for one month • Use of tools and machines: 10$ an hour
  • Rental of the space to companies such as Panasonic To develop their profit, they plan to focus on space rental and sponsorship of events.

Regarding the costs, 67% come from salaries and the rest from rent and electricity.

Regarding the revenue model of Makers Boot Camp, 10 to 20% come from consulting activities and 80 to 90% from venture funds.

To develop the Japanese entrepreneurship mind, Makina, the young CEO of MBC, targets in a close future to:

  • raise more money to help further hardware start-ups (they target 17M€ of venture capital fund end of 2017 vs 5M€ today),
  • grow their consultancy activity by developing collaborations between start-ups and large companies (40% vs 10-20% today),
  • create a bigger makerspace for Kyoto Makers Garage,
  • expand their model at the global scale,
  • and create an entrepreneurship program for high school students.

13 full-time employees work full-time at Makers Boot Camp including 4 people fully dedicated to Kyoto Makers Garage: 1 lab manager, 1 makerspace officer, 1 operation officer and an intern in charge of community management.

Today, 3 weekly classes take place in the space to learn how to use the machines: laser cutter, 3D printer and CNC milling. Those training courses are compulsory for makers before getting started to use the machines. Moreover, 1-month course was organized this summer for high school students.

In a close future, Connor aims to organize:

  • 3D printing monthly meet-ups
  • And fun and educational hackathons

Monthly meet-ups are set up by MBC at the makerspace, called “Monozukuri Hub” open events. The intent is to enable makers, experts, entrepreneurs or investors from all industries to share experiences and knowledge about the latest trends in hardware start-ups.

The lab team communicates thanks to Slack, shares documents via Google documents and follows projects with Quip.

Outside of its walls, Kyoto Makers Garage developed several partnerships to foster collaborations and share knowledge at the local and global scale: FrenchTech Tokyo, foreign organizations such as Usine IO or local Universities in Kyoto.

As the lab was created 2 months ago, no proper documentation process has been created so far.

However, Connor aims to make open source video lectures on how to use the machines both in English and Japanese. It would replace the classes he organizes today to teach makers how to use CNC, laser cutters or 3D printers.

In the region of Kyoto and Osaka, over a hundred SMEs specialized in healthcare, IoT or industry 4.0 and big companies such as Nintendo compose the Monozukuri ecosystem (Monozukuri = manufacturing).

Despite this bustling industrial environment, as Japan is a high risk-adverse country, entrepreneurs and start-ups struggle to get funding and to succeed their design for manufacturing (DFM).

That’s how Makino, Kenshin and Masatoshi decided to create in 2015 “Makers Boot Camp” (MBC). First hardware accelerator, then Corporate Venture Capital (CVC); MBC grows foreign and Japanese IoT based start-ups and accompany them to face the “Valley of Death”: the Design For Manufacturing.

Besides supporting startups, Makers Boot Camp decided to create its own makerspace: Kyoto Makers Garage (KMG) in September 2017 to give the entrepreneur mindset to the students of their region. In Japan, once you’ve finished your studies, it’s almost too late to become an entrepreneur as you’ve most likely started your career path in a big company. That’s here that Kyoto Makers Garage intervenes: their objective is to coach junior high school and university students who want to become an entrepreneur, a maker.

Both a makerspace and a co-working space, KMG wants people to be focused on IoT products and product design.

The key user figures are the following:

  • 25 hardware start-ups are followed by Makers Boot Camp,
  • 300 to 400 people entered Kyoto Makers Garage so far,
  • 20 regular members attended classes in the makerspace

If we focus on the makerspace’s users,

  • 50% of them are students as it’s free for them to use the space
  • The rest of it are makers (male professionals) and entrepreneurs.
  • Kyoto Makers Garage targets at the end of the year 60 to 70 monthly members.

Most those makers enter the lab to get connections, access qualitative machines and have an office. Diversity if key here. Thereby, a user is currently working on a keyboard and another one develops a work-of-art for an exhibition in Kyoto.

As students use the space for free, some of them volunteer freely to help KMG team build the space: machine repair, creation of user manuals to use the machines, etc.

According to the makerspace team, Japan, and especially Kyoto, is still at the beginning of its “maker journey”. Even though the government tries to foster the start-up movement and partly funded Kyoto Makers Garage, “there’s not enough makerspaces”: machines are barely affordable and accessible. Moreover, the Japanese society is still very structured and strict: once graduated, you’re doomed to be a full-time employee in a large company. Being an entrepreneur, in other words “free-timer”, is full of obstacles to get a loan or even a credit card.

Part of Makers Boot Camp organization, Kyoto Makers Garage was financially supported by Kyoto City at 80% for 3 years and the CVC itself.

The main revenues of the makerspace come from:

  • Events
  • Membership: 45$ for one month • Use of tools and machines: 10$ an hour
  • Rental of the space to companies such as Panasonic To develop their profit, they plan to focus on space rental and sponsorship of events.

Regarding the costs, 67% come from salaries and the rest from rent and electricity.

Regarding the revenue model of Makers Boot Camp, 10 to 20% come from consulting activities and 80 to 90% from venture funds.

To develop the Japanese entrepreneurship mind, Makina, the young CEO of MBC, targets in a close future to:

  • raise more money to help further hardware start-ups (they target 17M€ of venture capital fund end of 2017 vs 5M€ today),
  • grow their consultancy activity by developing collaborations between start-ups and large companies (40% vs 10-20% today),
  • create a bigger makerspace for Kyoto Makers Garage,
  • expand their model at the global scale,
  • and create an entrepreneurship program for high school students.

13 full-time employees work full-time at Makers Boot Camp including 4 people fully dedicated to Kyoto Makers Garage: 1 lab manager, 1 makerspace officer, 1 operation officer and an intern in charge of community management.

Today, 3 weekly classes take place in the space to learn how to use the machines: laser cutter, 3D printer and CNC milling. Those training courses are compulsory for makers before getting started to use the machines. Moreover, 1-month course was organized this summer for high school students.

In a close future, Connor aims to organize:

  • 3D printing monthly meet-ups
  • And fun and educational hackathons

Monthly meet-ups are set up by MBC at the makerspace, called “Monozukuri Hub” open events. The intent is to enable makers, experts, entrepreneurs or investors from all industries to share experiences and knowledge about the latest trends in hardware start-ups.

The lab team communicates thanks to Slack, shares documents via Google documents and follows projects with Quip.

Outside of its walls, Kyoto Makers Garage developed several partnerships to foster collaborations and share knowledge at the local and global scale: FrenchTech Tokyo, foreign organizations such as Usine IO or local Universities in Kyoto.

As the lab was created 2 months ago, no proper documentation process has been created so far.

However, Connor aims to make open source video lectures on how to use the machines both in English and Japanese. It would replace the classes he organizes today to teach makers how to use CNC, laser cutters or 3D printers.

Technologies & procédés mis à disposition

Impression 3D Découpe laser Fraisage numérique Electronique Outils pour le bois Etabli outillage

Services proposés

Accès payant aux machines & outils Temps libres Adhésions à l'atelier Prototypage Espace de travail partagé Formations & ateliers pratiques

Nos pratiques inspirantes

Ce que nous faisons de particulier pour gérer notre espace collaboratif

Monthly Meet-ups focusing on hardware start-ups

What is it?

Monthly meet-ups are set up by Makers Boot Camp at the Kyoto Makers Garage, called “Monozukuri Hub” open events.

In concrete terms?

The intent of these meet-ups is to enable makers, experts, entrepreneurs or investors from all industries to share experiences and knowledge about the latest trends in hardware start-ups. Each time, from 1 to 3 hardware start-ups hosted by Makers Boot Camp will present their concept and 1 to 3 external people will intervene on a new topic. For instance, on the 16th of October 2017, we participated to their 4th meet-up on “How to start it over?”.

Why it’s interesting?

It’s interesting first for start-ups as it provides visibility to those latter. Then, as those events are free and recurrent, the Makers Boot Camp team can sensitize its community on entrepreneurship, start-up and the maker movement. Finally, by bringing external and foreign speakers, the CVC shows that things happen worldwide and then create a sense of urgency.


Nos projets de makers

Inspirez-vous des projets DIY de notre équipe & nos membres

Mixing art and technology in Kyoto

Project history

Connor, technician manager of Kyoto Makers Garage, has always been fond of art and print making. Called the “3D-printer guy” in Kyoto where he arrived 6 years ago, Connor got introduced to the well-known Japanese artist Yamashita Kohei.

2 months ago, this latter, preparing an exhibition in Kyoto for mi-November, offered Connor to work jointly on his masterpiece.

How does he interact with the makerspace?

Yamashita and Connor mainly use the 3D printer to create their work-of-art. The project requires 4 stepper motors, 4 Arduino and 4 stepper drivers.

What’s next?

After the exhibition planned mid-November, Connor would like to keep on working with this artist on something new. Mixing art with technology is something he wants to develop.


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