FabCafe Taipei

What do you fab?

100, Taïwan, Taipei City, Zhongzheng District, 八德路一段1號

Fabcafé

Space size 200 m²

Opened in June 2013

Structure type Private company

Explored in August 2017


Make your fabulous fabrication & enjoy fabulous food at FabCafe!

Social networks

Main interests

Community Entrepreneurship Design Electronics

This workshop is great for:

Every single person & organisation!

The closest workshops nearby are:

Interview & guided tour

Meet someone from the team & discover the space by yourself!

Our workshop

Learn more about our space, members, machines & services!

Tim Wong, architect and urban designer, after spending 17 years in the US, came back in Asia in 2012 keeping in mind the idea to create an open studio.

When visiting the 1st FabCafe in Tokyo in June 2012, 3 months after its opening, Tim was conquered and offered to develop a global network of FabCafe. The idea of a café that gathers many kinds of people who can come and freely exchange their ideas was better than an open studio.

By expanding this movement, Tim wanted to create project-oriented synergies and collaborations between makers at a global scale. The Fabcafe brand aimed to be sustainable and scalable across the globe.

Its model is 2-sided. As it’s open, one is for general public who can enjoy food and beverages. Then it’s a place for designers, artists or makers to make and showcase their own work all over the world, thanks to FabCafe’s network.

Today, the model is growing: 9 FabCafé have been created and 130 people are part of the international team.

Convinced that creators’ designs could revitalize industries thanks to their ideas and new technologies, Tim wants to provide his FabCafe’s local and global network to foster collaborations between makers, general public and companies.

On average, 100 people a day step in Fabcafe Taipei. 90% of them are tourists and local workers who usually come to enjoy a simple cup of coffee or a meal as Fabcafé’s location is very touristic.

The remaining 10% are small businesses and students who want to benefit from the Fab Services but also design and creative industry people who desire to participate to an event or a workshop.

Most of those later discovered Fabcafé Taipei through facebook, very popular in Taiwan, or Fabcafé’s monthly e-mail magazine.

If you want to set up your own event or workshop in the Fabcafé, you just need to contact Yi-Pin who’ll be glad to help you through it.

To launch FabCafe Taipei in 2013, Tim Wong started with a 110 000 € investment budget to finance the rent, the 1st batch of machines, the material (food & beverage, fab tools, …) and of course the human resources.

3 years later, FabCafe Taipei was profitable with a 330K€ turnover.

In 2016, the main revenue streams were the following:

• Food & Beverage: 70% which comes from the events but also tourists and professionals who step in

• Fabrication services and workshop for companies: 15%

• Events and open-ended workshops: 10%

• External projects for organizations: 5%

The cost structure of the best-case scenario is roughly:

• 35% human resources

• 25 to 35% for stock and materials

• <20% for rent and utilities

• 10 to 20% for others

For FabCafes’ future, Tim thinks it’s important to slow down its growth and focus more on the global client network. The leading team is also looking at how blockchain could be used as a tracking, governance system.

At a Taiwanese scale, FabCafe Taipei will have to improve the quality of its content and increase its network of artists and designers to generate more local and global collaborations.

In terms of indicators, the team follows mainly the number of workshops, events, participants and the income.

With already 9 FabCafes in the world, the team exceeded the symbolic 100 number.

At FabCafe Taipei, 9 people work full time: Tim Wong, the founder, 4 deal with the fab services (prototyping, workshop and event organization) and 4 are in charge of the Café (coffee maker, waiter and cook).

The daily life of FabCafe Taipei is punctuated by all sorts of classes, workshops and events.

Every Saturday, basic 2-hour fab classes take place to teach how to use either the laser cutting machine either the 3D printer.

Then 2 to 4 open-ended workshops are organized monthly. After two occurrences, a same workshop will be improved. Currently, 2 main ones take place in the lab:

Then, once a month, coffee tasting workshops are hosted by the coffee team.

Ideation workshops are also regularly provided for companies inside or outside the FabCafé.

In terms of events and projects, FabCafe Taipei sets up local meet-ups once or twice a month and co-organizes global programs for and with the Global FabCafe network.

The main ones are

  • YouFab Awards: international maker challenge,

  • Smart Craft Studio: intensive 3-week design prototyping exchange program that aims to integrate traditional making techniques with digital fabrication,

  • “More than project”: project to help the Japanese government to promote its local industry.

Each week, a 1-hour global team meeting occurs to share with the whole FabCafe network what happened during the week: new workshop, event and product contents and key contacts are shared.

For every global weekly meeting, the team formalizes in a google document what happened during the FabCafe week.

Their main documentation tools are Google Drive, Flickr and FabCafe’s blog.

Yi-Pin and Paul from the Fab team draw most of their inspiration from both Instructables with its technical tutorials and Youtube with its raw content.

Tim Wong, architect and urban designer, after spending 17 years in the US, came back in Asia in 2012 keeping in mind the idea to create an open studio.

When visiting the 1st FabCafe in Tokyo in June 2012, 3 months after its opening, Tim was conquered and offered to develop a global network of FabCafe. The idea of a café that gathers many kinds of people who can come and freely exchange their ideas was better than an open studio.

By expanding this movement, Tim wanted to create project-oriented synergies and collaborations between makers at a global scale. The Fabcafe brand aimed to be sustainable and scalable across the globe.

Its model is 2-sided. As it’s open, one is for general public who can enjoy food and beverages. Then it’s a place for designers, artists or makers to make and showcase their own work all over the world, thanks to FabCafe’s network.

Today, the model is growing: 9 FabCafé have been created and 130 people are part of the international team.

Convinced that creators’ designs could revitalize industries thanks to their ideas and new technologies, Tim wants to provide his FabCafe’s local and global network to foster collaborations between makers, general public and companies.

On average, 100 people a day step in Fabcafe Taipei. 90% of them are tourists and local workers who usually come to enjoy a simple cup of coffee or a meal as Fabcafé’s location is very touristic.

The remaining 10% are small businesses and students who want to benefit from the Fab Services but also design and creative industry people who desire to participate to an event or a workshop.

Most of those later discovered Fabcafé Taipei through facebook, very popular in Taiwan, or Fabcafé’s monthly e-mail magazine.

If you want to set up your own event or workshop in the Fabcafé, you just need to contact Yi-Pin who’ll be glad to help you through it.

To launch FabCafe Taipei in 2013, Tim Wong started with a 110 000 € investment budget to finance the rent, the 1st batch of machines, the material (food & beverage, fab tools, …) and of course the human resources.

3 years later, FabCafe Taipei was profitable with a 330K€ turnover.

In 2016, the main revenue streams were the following:

• Food & Beverage: 70% which comes from the events but also tourists and professionals who step in

• Fabrication services and workshop for companies: 15%

• Events and open-ended workshops: 10%

• External projects for organizations: 5%

The cost structure of the best-case scenario is roughly:

• 35% human resources

• 25 to 35% for stock and materials

• <20% for rent and utilities

• 10 to 20% for others

For FabCafes’ future, Tim thinks it’s important to slow down its growth and focus more on the global client network. The leading team is also looking at how blockchain could be used as a tracking, governance system.

At a Taiwanese scale, FabCafe Taipei will have to improve the quality of its content and increase its network of artists and designers to generate more local and global collaborations.

In terms of indicators, the team follows mainly the number of workshops, events, participants and the income.

With already 9 FabCafes in the world, the team exceeded the symbolic 100 number.

At FabCafe Taipei, 9 people work full time: Tim Wong, the founder, 4 deal with the fab services (prototyping, workshop and event organization) and 4 are in charge of the Café (coffee maker, waiter and cook).

The daily life of FabCafe Taipei is punctuated by all sorts of classes, workshops and events.

Every Saturday, basic 2-hour fab classes take place to teach how to use either the laser cutting machine either the 3D printer.

Then 2 to 4 open-ended workshops are organized monthly. After two occurrences, a same workshop will be improved. Currently, 2 main ones take place in the lab:

Then, once a month, coffee tasting workshops are hosted by the coffee team.

Ideation workshops are also regularly provided for companies inside or outside the FabCafé.

In terms of events and projects, FabCafe Taipei sets up local meet-ups once or twice a month and co-organizes global programs for and with the Global FabCafe network.

The main ones are

  • YouFab Awards: international maker challenge,

  • Smart Craft Studio: intensive 3-week design prototyping exchange program that aims to integrate traditional making techniques with digital fabrication,

  • “More than project”: project to help the Japanese government to promote its local industry.

Each week, a 1-hour global team meeting occurs to share with the whole FabCafe network what happened during the week: new workshop, event and product contents and key contacts are shared.

For every global weekly meeting, the team formalizes in a google document what happened during the FabCafe week.

Their main documentation tools are Google Drive, Flickr and FabCafe’s blog.

Yi-Pin and Paul from the Fab team draw most of their inspiration from both Instructables with its technical tutorials and Youtube with its raw content.

Technologies & processes available

3D printing 3D scanning Electronics Laser cutting Traditional tools

Services offered

Open moments Prototyping Restaurant Talks & conferences Classes & workshops Creations shop Fabcafé Coffee shop

Our best practices

The inspiring things we do here to run our collaborative space

the construction of a global distributed network

What is it?

FabCafe Taipei is part of the 9 FabCafe global network. As such, the team documents and shares on a weekly basis every new content and contact created.

In concrete terms?

Each week, a 1-hour global team meeting occurs to share with the whole FabCafe network what happened during the week: new workshop, event and product contents and key contacts are shared.

For every global weekly meeting, the team formalizes in a google document what happened during the FabCafe week.

Why it’s interesting?

It’s interesting for 2 main reasons.

First, sharing the content created every week is an excellent tool to create synergies but also to save time and energy.

Then, enabling designers, artists and makers to make and showcase their work all over the world empowers those latter and fosters synergies and collaborations.


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